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The Origins of Racial Discrimination in Public Health: The 1793 Yellow Fever Epidemic of Philadelphia

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dc.contributor.author Nelson, Abigail L.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-24T16:04:39Z
dc.date.available 2020-04-24T16:04:39Z
dc.date.issued 2020-05-21
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11868/1001
dc.description.abstract At the start of the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the first public health doctrines were being formulated into proper legal documents as the city struggled to stem the outbreak. This paper argues that the origins of discriminatory rhetoric in public health can be traced back to the racist ideas of Matthew Carey and Benjamin Rush. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Honors Program, The University of Tampa en_US
dc.subject Yellow Fever Epidemic en_US
dc.subject 1793 en_US
dc.subject Philadelphia en_US
dc.subject Racism en_US
dc.subject Public Health en_US
dc.subject Benjamin Rush en_US
dc.subject Mathew Care en_US
dc.subject Absalom Jones en_US
dc.subject Richard Allen en_US
dc.title The Origins of Racial Discrimination in Public Health: The 1793 Yellow Fever Epidemic of Philadelphia en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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